Total Energy Model

EDNA Total Energy Model 2.0

The EDNA total energy model (TEM) is a quantitative global model of the ‘total energy use’ of connected devices. It covers the energy used by connected devices in these 3 conditions: 

  • Media streaming: a condition in which audio-visual content data is being transmitted over a network to a Smart TV, Casting Stick or similar entertainment device and includes the energy that the devices uses to fulfil its primary function.
  • Network active: a condition in which a device is communicating actively with another device on a network.
  • Network standby: a condition which allows a device to resume its main function upon a receiving a remotely initiated trigger via a network connection.

The TEM also covers the energy use of devices deployed in local area networks (LANs) such as modems and routers, as well as the ‘upstream’ energy that connected devices stimulate in wide area networks (WANs) and data centres. The data transmitted and received by connected devices typically flows through WANs to/from data centres. We call the energy used by these WANs and data centres in transmitting/processing this data ‘upstream’ energy. Upstream energy is estimated for both Media Streaming and for Non Media Streaming. It is calculated by applying a ‘network intensity’ to each data bit transmitted/received from connected devices.

The TEM graphs represent selected outputs from the TEM. The Base Case displays the stock and the total energy use of connected devices in a ‘base case’ scenario. The other three graphs allow the user to vary some of the energy use parameters of connected devices and LANs/WANs/data centres, and graph the resultant energy use.

There are 2 detailed reports that describe the TEM modelling in detail. The V1.0 report describes the original model (TEM1.0) and the V2.0 report describes the updates to modelling that were carried out in 2020.

Note: the Total Energy Model and accompanying report and graphs were commissioned by the EDNA Annex of the 4E TCP and authored by Energy Consult Pty Ltd. The views, conclusions and recommendations are solely those of the authors and do not state or reflect those of EDNA, the 4E TCP or its member countries. Views, findings and publications of EDNA and the 4E TCP do not necessarily represent the views or policies of the IEA Secretariat or its individual member countries.