2022

Annual
Report

2022

Annual
Report

Chair’s Statement

Once again Energy has dominated headlines during 2022 for all the wrong reasons!  Few parts of the globe have escaped without experiencing escalating costs and concerns about security of supply. 

The hardships this has caused has only reinforced the need to accelerate our transition to a more sustainable, affordable global energy system, where energy efficiency and demand flexibility plays a central role. As noted by our previous Chair in last year’s Annual Report: “energy efficiency is the component that makes the transition to clean energy sufficiently robust, affordable and timely.”

But words are not enough and so it is particularly pleasing to see evidence that 4E activities really do help governments to implement policies that make a difference on the ground.

Through this research and collaboration, our Members have become ever more ambitious in 2022, developing innovative policy approaches that are driving technological advances. Importantly, 4E provides a mechanism for sharing these innovations amongst Members and to other economies in all regions.

The sharing of information and expertise has always been at the core of 4E’s work, whether this is between governments or by engaging with industry and other stakeholders. This has been challenging during the Covid pandemic, but through the increasing use of webinars and other on-line platforms, we have reached out to more people than in previous years.

In 2022, exceptional collaborative efforts by 4E’s EDNA, EMSA, PECTA and SSL Annexes have created a range of practical, topical, and valuable policy advice and leading edge research that is freely available and disseminated worldwide.

In November 2022, at our first face-to-face meeting for three years, 4E began the process of deciding on our major activities during our next five-year term starting in 2024. The world looks very different to how it did at the start of this term, and there is no shortage of valuable opportunities for 4E to consider. However, our limited resources demand that we focus on areas where the collaboration between Member governments can make most impact.

What is certain is that our immense body of work over previous years, combined with the expertise and engagement of our Members, gives us a unique platform for launching the next phase. 

Hans-Paul Siderius

Netherlands | Vice-chair

Brian Fitzgerald

New Zealand | Vice-chair

Chair’s Statement

Once again Energy has dominated headlines during 2022 for all the wrong reasons!  Few parts of the globe have escaped without experiencing escalating costs and concerns about security of supply. 

The hardships this has caused has only reinforced the need to accelerate our transition to a more sustainable, affordable global energy system, where energy efficiency and demand flexibility plays a central role. As noted by our previous Chair in last year’s Annual Report: “energy efficiency is the component that makes the transition to clean energy sufficiently robust, affordable and timely.”

But words are not enough and so it is particularly pleasing to see evidence that 4E activities really do help governments to implement policies that make a difference on the ground.

Through this research and collaboration, our Members have become ever more ambitious in 2022, developing innovative policy approaches that are driving technological advances. Importantly, 4E provides a mechanism for sharing these innovations amongst Members and to other economies in all regions.

The sharing of information and expertise has always been at the core of 4E’s work, whether this is between governments or by engaging with industry and other stakeholders. This has been challenging during the Covid pandemic, but through the increasing use of webinars and other on-line platforms, we have reached out to more people than in previous years.

In 2022, exceptional collaborative efforts by 4E’s EDNA, EMSA, PECTA and SSL Annexes have created a range of practical, topical, and valuable policy advice and leading edge research that is freely available and disseminated worldwide.

In November 2022, at our first face-to-face meeting for three years, 4E began the process of deciding on our major activities during our next five-year term starting in 2024. The world looks very different to how it did at the start of this term, and there is no shortage of valuable opportunities for 4E to consider. However, our limited resources demand that we focus on areas where the collaboration between Member governments can make most impact.

What is certain is that our immense body of work over previous years, combined with the expertise and engagement of our Members, gives us a unique platform for launching the next phase. 

Hans-Paul Siderius

Netherlands | Vice-chair

Brian Fitzgerald

New Zealand | Vice-chair

Chair’s Statement

Once again Energy has dominated headlines during 2022 for all the wrong reasons!  Few parts of the globe have escaped without experiencing escalating costs and concerns about security of supply. 

The hardships this has caused has only reinforced the need to accelerate our transition to a more sustainable, affordable global energy system, where energy efficiency and demand flexibility plays a central role. As noted by our previous Chair in last year’s Annual Report: “energy efficiency is the component that makes the transition to clean energy sufficiently robust, affordable and timely.”

But words are not enough and so it is particularly pleasing to see evidence that 4E activities really do help governments to implement policies that make a difference on the ground.

Through this research and collaboration, our Members have become ever more ambitious in 2022, developing innovative policy approaches that are driving technological advances. Importantly, 4E provides a mechanism for sharing these innovations amongst Members and to other economies in all regions.

The sharing of information and expertise has always been at the core of 4E’s work, whether this is between governments or by engaging with industry and other stakeholders. This has been challenging during the Covid pandemic, but through the increasing use of webinars and other on-line platforms, we have reached out to more people than in previous years.

In 2022, exceptional collaborative efforts by 4E’s EDNA, EMSA, PECTA and SSL Annexes have created a range of practical, topical, and valuable policy advice and leading edge research that is freely available and disseminated worldwide.

In November 2022, at our first face-to-face meeting for three years, 4E began the process of deciding on our major activities during our next five-year term starting in 2024. The world looks very different to how it did at the start of this term, and there is no shortage of valuable opportunities for 4E to consider. However, our limited resources demand that we focus on areas where the collaboration between Member governments can make most impact.

What is certain is that our immense body of work over previous years, combined with the expertise and engagement of our Members, gives us a unique platform for launching the next phase. 

Hans-Paul Siderius

Netherlands | Vice-chair

Brian Fitzgerald

New Zealand | Vice-chair

Technology Collaboration Programme

Policy Packages for Energy Efficiency

Policy Packages for
Energy Efficiency

To support stronger action on efficiency the IEA has designed a policy toolkit for governments, launched at the IEA’s 7th Annual Global Conference on Energy Efficiency in June 2022. The toolkit provides a practical approach to accelerate action on energy efficiency by guiding governments in the design of effective policy measures, the support of policy decisions and the delivery of policy actions.

To support stronger action on efficiency the IEA has designed a policy toolkit for governments, launched at the IEA’s 7th Annual Global Conference on Energy Efficiency in June 2022. The toolkit provides a practical approach to accelerate action on energy efficiency by guiding governments in the design of effective policy measures, the support of policy decisions and the delivery of policy actions.

The Role played by 4E

Not since the founding of the IEA in 1974 has the need for a coordinated effort on energy efficiency to reduce wasteful and inefficient use of energy been so great. No other energy resource can compare with energy efficiency as a solution to the energy affordability, security of supply and climate change crises. This is why the IEA calls energy efficiency the “first fuel” of all energy transitions.

4E aims to promote energy efficiency as the key to ensuring safe, reliable, affordable and sustainable energy systems.

The Role played by 4E

Not since the founding of the IEA in 1974 has the need for a coordinated effort on energy efficiency to reduce wasteful and inefficient use of energy been so great. No other energy resource can compare with energy efficiency as a solution to the energy affordability, security of supply and climate change crises. This is why the IEA calls energy efficiency the “first fuel” of all energy transitions.

4E aims to promote energy efficiency as the key to ensuring safe, reliable, affordable and sustainable energy systems.

Overview of 4E Structure and Activities

Overview of 4E Structure and Activities

Executive Committee

4E is managed by an Executive Committee (ExCo) comprising one voting delegate from each of the 15 Members. The ExCo meets twice yearly to manage the work programme of 4E, including the dissemination of 4E’s research results. Secretariat functions for the ExCo are provided by the Operating Agent, funded by annual membership fees.

During 2022, the 4E office-bearers comprised:

Chair of 4E: 
  • Jamie Hulan (Canada) – retired late 2022
  • Replaced by Hans-Paul Siderius (Netherlands) & Brian Fitzgerald (New Zealand)
Vice-chairs of 4E: 
  • Hans-Paul Siderius (Netherlands)
  • Brian Fitzgerald (New Zealand)
  • Ashley Armstrong (US)
  • John Cymbalsky (US), retired 2022
The 29th meeting of the Executive Committee (ExCo) was held online due to restrictions on travel during the Covid pandemic; however the 30th took place in Utrecht, hosted by the Netherlands. Attendance at these meetings is shown in the table on the right. A full list of the 15 Members of the ExCo during 2022 is shown in Attachment 1.

Attendance at 
2022 ExCo meetings

29th - Online

Attendance at
2022 ExCo meetings

30th - Netherlands

4E Membership indicators

Annexes

Annexes provide a mechanism for collaborative research amongst 4E Members on key technologies or topics.

The 4E structure is shown below, and this highlights the four existing Annexes:

Reports on all currently operating Annexes are included later in this report.

There are about 300 million electric motors operating in the world today and only about 20% equipped with a variable speed drive that makes them more efficient. By adding these drives to the rest of these motors worldwide, we could save 10% of the electricity in the world, we’re talking about a really huge number just to drive that efficiency.

Annexes provide a mechanism for collaborative research amongst 4E Members on key technologies or topics.

The 4E structure is shown below, and this highlights the four existing Annexes:

Reports on all currently operating Annexes are included later in this report.

There are about 300 million electric motors operating in the world today and only about 20% equipped with a variable speed drive that makes them more efficient. By adding these drives to the rest of these motors worldwide, we could save 10% of the electricity in the world, we’re talking about a really huge number just to drive that efficiency.

4E Projects

4E projects are developed and funded by the Executive Committee to support policies for energy efficient end-use equipment. These research activities cover a wide range of technologies and cross-cutting issues and benefit from the collective insights provided by all 4E Members. 

The achievements in 2022 of the most prominent 4E projects are illustrated below.

Product Energy Efficiency Trends (PEET)

The PEET project assists 4E Members to compare the performance of major products across economies and regions by examining the scope and stringency of regulatory policies within these economies.

PEET provides a mechanism for policy makers and regulators to understand the differences in scope, test methods and stringency of national regulations and helps to bring them into closer alignment.

 4E Members met in 2022 for five workshops to discuss the following important topics of significant relevance to several countries: 
  • Regulatory proposals for televisions, computer monitors and digital signage displays in Australia and New Zealand (15 June, online)
  • Embedded motors (7 September, online)
  • Testing luminance in electronic displays (5 October, online)
  • Heat pumps for hydronic heating applications (14 November, Utrecht)
  • Demand flexibility in appliances and equipment (16 November, Utrecht)
In addition, we launched a new ‘web crawler’ project in 2022 that will collect energy performance and price information for refrigerator/freezers, televisions, room air-conditions, and washing machines.  Data will be collected in four separate ‘crawls’ between mid-2022 to the end of 2023. 

Figure 1: Illustration of influence of luminance and screen area on power consumption in TVs

Grey plane = best fit of power against luminance and screen area
Blue plane = best fit relationship between screen size and power

Through PEET, Australia is able to engage directly with policy makers in other countries and gain valuable insights into alternative policy approaches. Being able to discuss topics in depth with peers in other governments, share information and our experiences not only helps Australia to develop more effective policy solutions, but also encourages greater international harmonisation and allows others to benefit from Australia’s knowledge and experience.

The PEET project assists 4E Members to compare the performance of major products across economies and regions by examining the scope and stringency of regulatory policies within these economies.

PEET provides a mechanism for policy makers and regulators to understand the differences in scope, test methods and stringency of national regulations and helps to bring them into closer alignment.

 4E Members met in 2022 for five workshops to discuss the following important topics of significant relevance to several countries: 
  • Regulatory proposals for televisions, computer monitors and digital signage displays in Australia and New Zealand (15 June, online)
  • Embedded motors (7 September, online)
  • Testing luminance in electronic displays (5 October, online)
  • Heat pumps for hydronic heating applications (14 November, Utrecht)
  • Demand flexibility in appliances and equipment (16 November, Utrecht)
In addition, we launched a new ‘web crawler’ project in 2022 that will collect energy performance and price information for refrigerator/freezers, televisions, room air-conditions, and washing machines.  Data will be collected in four separate ‘crawls’ between mid-2022 to the end of 2023. 

Figure 1: Illustration of influence of luminance and screen area on power consumption in TVs

Through PEET, Australia is able to engage directly with policy makers in other countries and gain valuable insights into alternative policy approaches. Being able to discuss topics in depth with peers in other governments, share information and our experiences not only helps Australia to develop more effective policy solutions, but also encourages greater international harmonisation and allows others to benefit from Australia’s knowledge and experience.

Load Based Testing for Variable Speed 
Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

Responding to the need to develop practical load-based testing regimes for air conditioners and heat pumps, this 4E project commenced in late 2020 and concludes with a series of round-robin tests in laboratories selected by 4E Members.

Having published new test guidance suited to variable capacity units at the end of 2021, the round robin of two ducted and two non-ducted units began in 2022 with tests conducted in the US.  

The units are currently being tested in Denmark, Korea and Australia, with the results to be analysed in 2023.

Responding to the need to develop practical load-based testing regimes for air conditioners and heat pumps, this 4E project commenced in late 2020 and concludes with a series of round-robin tests in laboratories selected by 4E Members.

Having published new test guidance suited to variable capacity units at the end of 2021, the round robin of two ducted and two non-ducted units began in 2022 with tests conducted in the US.  

The units are currently being tested in Denmark, Korea and Australia, with the results to be analysed in 2023.

Evaluation Guide for EES&L Programmes

This Guidebook is intended to promote impact evaluations of equipment energy efficiency standards and labelling (EES&L) programmes in a consistent and transparent manner.

While not being prescriptive, it explains the key methods that are proven to deliver robust and credible evaluations within a simple guide. Since previous 4E projects have found that it is sometimes difficult to understand the assumptions used in the presentation of programme outcomes, the guide also covers the reporting of results.

Since evaluations are often undertaken by an independent third party, the guide is designed to provide a clear scope of work or request for proposals (RFP), however, it may also be used to plan in-house evaluations of EES&L programmes.

Check list for commissioning a programme evaluation

While we know that energy efficiency programmes are highly cost-effective and have multiple benefits, we all need to continually demonstrate the scale of these achievements. By publishing this practical Guidebook we hope to encourage EES&L programmes to conduct more thorough and transparent examinations of their results. In this way, we can extend the evidence base and gain further support to be ever more ambitious.

This Guidebook is intended to promote impact evaluations of equipment energy efficiency standards and labelling (EES&L) programmes in a consistent and transparent manner.

While not being prescriptive, it explains the key methods that are proven to deliver robust and credible evaluations within a simple guide. Since previous 4E projects have found that it is sometimes difficult to understand the assumptions used in the presentation of programme outcomes, the guide also covers the reporting of results.

Since evaluations are often undertaken by an independent third party, the guide is designed to provide a clear scope of work or request for proposals (RFP), however, it may also be used to plan in-house evaluations of EES&L programmes.

Check list for commissioning a programme evaluation

While we know that energy efficiency programmes are highly cost-effective and have multiple benefits, we all need to continually demonstrate the scale of these achievements. By publishing this practical Guidebook we hope to encourage EES&L programmes to conduct more thorough and transparent examinations of their results. In this way, we can extend the evidence base and gain further support to be ever more ambitious.

Regulating Energy Using Systems

Extending product policies to cover relevant energy-using systems has the potential to reduce annual global energy consumption by 9% (17,000 PJ, 4,780 TWh). This is larger than the total annual use of electricity in the United States in 2021. It is also more than three times the electricity savings generated by the nine most successful national standards and labelling programmes for individual products1.

This is why 4E has been working on practicalities of extending product regulations to energy-using systems.

Figure 2: Estimates of energy savings if product policies were extended to cover energy-using systems

Extending product policies to cover relevant energy-using systems has the potential to reduce annual global energy consumption by 9% (17,000 PJ, 4,780 TWh). This is larger than the total annual use of electricity in the United States in 2021. It is also more than three times the electricity savings generated by the nine most successful national standards and labelling programmes for individual products1.

This is why 4E has been working on practicalities of extending product regulations to energy-using systems.

Figure 2: Estimates of energy savings if product policies were extended to cover energy-using systems

In 2022, 4E published ‘Progressing Energy Efficiency Policies for Systems’, a summary of the work undertaken by 4E over the previous four years. This includes estimates of savings potential, options for overcoming some of the hurdles to regulation and the identification of system types that are most suitable for the next generation of energy efficiency regulation.

This work is ongoing and 4E welcomes interaction with others interested in investigating this topic more widely.

4E’s research published in 2022 shows that the potential energy savings from regulating energy-using systems could dwarf the already considerable savings made by regulating products. However, we have also studied the considerable legal, administrative, and technical barriers in depth, so we are aware of the difficulties ahead. However, the scale of potential savings together with 4E’s mission to consider topics that are not being addressed by other international collaborations justifies 4E’s investment of time and effort in finding solutions.

1 See IEA 4E Achievements of Energy Efficiency Appliance and Equipment Standards and Labelling Programmes: A Global Assessment in 2021 https://iea.blob.core.windows.net/assets/996ea40e-e010-48c3-ab53-9b4f72ddc815/AchievementsofEnergyEfficiencyApplianceandEquipmentStandardsandLabellingProgrammes.pdf

In 2022, 4E published ‘Progressing Energy Efficiency Policies for Systems’, a summary of the work undertaken by 4E over the previous four years.This includes estimates of savings potential, options for overcoming some of the hurdles to regulation and the identification of system types that are most suitable for the next generation of energy efficiency regulation.

This work is ongoing and 4E welcomes interaction with others interested in investigating this topic more widely.

4E’s research published in 2022 shows that the potential energy savings from regulating energy-using systems could dwarf the already considerable savings made by regulating products. However, we have also studied the considerable legal, administrative, and technical barriers in depth, so we are aware of the difficulties ahead. However, the scale of potential savings together with 4E’s mission to consider topics that are not being addressed by other international collaborations justifies 4E’s investment of time and effort in finding solutions.

1 See IEA 4E Achievements of Energy Efficiency Appliance and Equipment Standards and Labelling Programmes: A Global Assessment in 2021 https://iea.blob.core.windows.net/assets/996ea40e-e010-48c3-ab53-9b4f72ddc815/AchievementsofEnergyEfficiencyApplianceandEquipmentStandardsandLabellingProgrammes.pdf

IEA Publications

4E works closely with the IEA and provides expert input to many reports, including combining on joint publications and events. This gives high level visibility to much of 4E’s research work.

4E makes a significant contribution to the appliance & equipment sections of the IEA’s annual flagship publications on energy efficiency and on digitalisation.

Further examples of collaborative work with the IEA and other TCPS are shown later in this report.

Every year the 4E TCP delivers important developments in the understanding of how to improve end-use energy efficiency and provides meaningful contributions to IEA work and several of its major publications. For example, the IEA’s flagship publication, Energy Efficiency 2022, cited 4E’s analysis of the energy consumption by systems and drew on other valuable 4E work. The value of our collaboration with 4E is particularly evident the field of Digitalisation, where the work of 4E continues to provide insights into the role this can play in encouraging energy systems to use energy more efficiently.

4E works closely with the IEA and provides expert input to many reports, including combining on joint publications and events. This gives high level visibility to much of 4E’s research work.

4E makes a significant contribution to the appliance & equipment sections of the IEA’s annual flagship publications on energy efficiency and on digitalisation.

Further examples of collaborative work with the IEA and other TCPS are shown later in this report.

Every year the 4E TCP delivers important developments in the understanding of how to improve end-use energy efficiency and provides meaningful contributions to IEA work and several of its major publications. For example, the IEA’s flagship publication, Energy Efficiency 2022, cited 4E’s analysis of the energy consumption by systems and drew on other valuable 4E work. The value of our collaboration with 4E is particularly evident the field of Digitalisation, where the work of 4E continues to provide insights into the role this can play in encouraging energy systems to use energy more efficiently.

Regulators Forum on Monitoring,
Verification and Enforcement (MV&E)

MV&E is a vital component of regulatory policies to ensure that expected energy efficiency gains are realised in practice. Building on the considerable experience of 4E Members and their national MV&E programmes, 4E provides a unique mechanism for regulators to raise issues of concern and share approaches to market surveillance and enforcement in confidence.

4E provides a unique forum for regulators to meet face-to-face alongside ExCo meetings to share information on topical issues relating to compliance and enforcement.

Regulators Forum on Monitoring,
Verification and Enforcement (MV&E)

MV&E is a vital component of regulatory policies to ensure that expected energy efficiency gains are realised in practice. Building on the considerable experience of 4E Members and their national MV&E programmes, 4E provides a unique mechanism for regulators to raise issues of concern and share approaches to market surveillance and enforcement in confidence.

4E provides a unique forum for regulators to meet face-to-face alongside ExCo meetings to share information on topical issues relating to compliance and enforcement.

4E Projects

4E projects are developed and funded by the Executive Committee to support policies for efficient end-use equipment. These research activities cover a wide range of technologies and cross-cutting issues and benefit from the collective insights provided by all 4E Members. 

The achievements in 2022 of the most prominent 4E projects are illustrated below.

Product Energy Efficiency Trends (PEET)

The PEET project assists 4E Members to compare the performance of major products across economies and regions by examining the scope and stringency of regulatory policies within these economies.

PEET provides a mechanism for policy makers and regulators to understand the differences in scope, test methods and stringency of national regulations and helps to bring them into closer alignment.

 4E Members met in 2022 for five workshops to discuss the following important topics of significant relevance to several countries: 
  • Regulatory proposals for televisions, computer monitors and digital signage displays in Australia and New Zealand (15 June, online)
  • Embedded motors (7 September, online)
  • Testing luminance in electronic displays (5 October, online)
  • Heat pumps for hydronic heating applications (14 November, Utrecht)
  • Demand flexibility in appliances and equipment (16 November, Utrecht)
In addition, we launched a new ‘web crawler’ project in 2022 that will collect energy performance and price information for refrigerator/freezers, televisions, room air-conditions, and washing machines.  Data will be collected in four separate ‘crawls’ between mid-2022 to the end of 2023. 

Figure 1: Illustration of influence of luminance and screen area on power consumption in TVs

Grey plane = best fit of power against luminance and screen area
Blue plane = best fit relationship between screen size and power

Through PEET, Australia is able to engage directly with policy makers in other countries and gain valuable insights into alternative policy approaches. Being able to discuss topics in depth with peers in other governments, share information and our experiences not only helps Australia to develop more effective policy solutions, but also encourages greater international harmonisation and allows others to benefit from Australia’s knowledge and experience.

The PEET project assists 4E Members to compare the performance of major products across economies and regions by examining the scope and stringency of regulatory policies within these economies.

PEET provides a mechanism for policy makers and regulators to understand the differences in scope, test methods and stringency of national regulations and helps to bring them into closer alignment.

 4E Members met in 2022 for five workshops to discuss the following important topics of significant relevance to several countries: 
  • Regulatory proposals for televisions, computer monitors and digital signage displays in Australia and New Zealand (15 June, online)
  • Embedded motors (7 September, online)
  • Testing luminance in electronic displays (5 October, online)
  • Heat pumps for hydronic heating applications (14 November, Utrecht)
  • Demand flexibility in appliances and equipment (16 November, Utrecht)
In addition, we launched a new ‘web crawler’ project in 2022 that will collect energy performance and price information for refrigerator/freezers, televisions, room air-conditions, and washing machines.  Data will be collected in four separate ‘crawls’ between mid-2022 to the end of 2023. 

Figure 1: Illustration of influence of luminance and screen area on power consumption in TVs

Through PEET, Australia is able to engage directly with policy makers in other countries and gain valuable insights into alternative policy approaches. Being able to discuss topics in depth with peers in other governments, share information and our experiences not only helps Australia to develop more effective policy solutions, but also encourages greater international harmonisation and allows others to benefit from Australia’s knowledge and experience.

Load Based Testing for Variable Speed 
Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

Responding to the need to develop practical load-based testing regimes for air conditioners and heat pumps, this 4E project commenced in late 2020 and concludes with a series of round-robin tests in laboratories selected by 4E Members.

Having published new test guidance suited to variable capacity units at the end of 2021, the round robin of two ducted and two non-ducted units began in 2022 with tests conducted in the US.  

The units are currently being tested in Denmark, Korea and Australia, with the results to be analysed in 2023.

Responding to the need to develop practical load-based testing regimes for air conditioners and heat pumps, this 4E project commenced in late 2020 and concludes with a series of round-robin tests in laboratories selected by 4E Members.

Having published new test guidance suited to variable capacity units at the end of 2021, the round robin of two ducted and two non-ducted units began in 2022 with tests conducted in the US.  

The units are currently being tested in Denmark, Korea and Australia, with the results to be analysed in 2023.

Evaluation Guide for EES&L Programmes

This Guidebook is intended to promote impact evaluations of equipment energy efficiency standards and labelling (EES&L) programmes in a consistent and transparent manner.

While not being prescriptive, it explains the key methods that are proven to deliver robust and credible evaluations within a simple guide. Since previous 4E projects have found that it is sometimes difficult to understand the assumptions used in the presentation of programme outcomes, the guide also covers the reporting of results.

Since evaluations are often undertaken by an independent third party, the guide is designed to provide a clear scope of work or request for proposals (RFP), however, it may also be used to plan in-house evaluations of EES&L programmes.

Check list for commissioning a programme evaluation

While we know that energy efficiency programmes are highly cost-effective and have multiple benefits, we all need to continually demonstrate the scale of these achievements. By publishing this practical Guidebook we hope to encourage EES&L programmes to conduct more thorough and transparent examinations of their results. In this way, we can extend the evidence base and gain further support to be ever more ambitious.

This Guidebook is intended to promote impact evaluations of equipment energy efficiency standards and labelling (EES&L) programmes in a consistent and transparent manner.

While not being prescriptive, it explains the key methods that are proven to deliver robust and credible evaluations within a simple guide. Since previous 4E projects have found that it is sometimes difficult to understand the assumptions used in the presentation of programme outcomes, the guide also covers the reporting of results.

Since evaluations are often undertaken by an independent third party, the guide is designed to provide a clear scope of work or request for proposals (RFP), however, it may also be used to plan in-house evaluations of EES&L programmes.

Check list for commissioning a programme evaluation

While we know that energy efficiency programmes are highly cost-effective and have multiple benefits, we all need to continually demonstrate the scale of these achievements. By publishing this practical Guidebook we hope to encourage EES&L programmes to conduct more thorough and transparent examinations of their results. In this way, we can extend the evidence base and gain further support to be ever more ambitious.

Regulating Energy Using Systems

Extending product policies to cover relevant energy-using systems has the potential to reduce annual global energy consumption by 9% (17,000 PJ, 4,780 TWh). This is larger than the total annual use of electricity in the United States in 2021. It is also more than three times the electricity savings generated by the nine most successful national standards and labelling programmes for individual products1.

This is why 4E has been working on practicalities of extending product regulations to energy-using systems.

Figure 2: Estimates of energy savings if product policies were extended to cover energy-using systems

Extending product policies to cover relevant energy-using systems has the potential to reduce annual global energy consumption by 9% (17,000 PJ, 4,780 TWh). This is larger than the total annual use of electricity in the United States in 2021. It is also more than three times the electricity savings generated by the nine most successful national standards and labelling programmes for individual products1.

This is why 4E has been working on practicalities of extending product regulations to energy-using systems.

Figure 2: Estimates of energy savings if product policies were extended to cover energy-using systems

In 2022, 4E published ‘Progressing Energy Efficiency Policies for Systems’, a summary of the work undertaken by 4E over the previous four years. This includes estimates of savings potential, options for overcoming some of the hurdles to regulation and the identification of system types that are most suitable for the next generation of energy efficiency regulation.

This work is ongoing and 4E welcomes interaction with others interested in investigating this topic more widely.

4E’s research published in 2022 shows that the potential energy savings from regulating energy-using systems could dwarf the already considerable savings made by regulating products. However, we have also studied the considerable legal, administrative, and technical barriers in depth, so we are aware of the difficulties ahead. However, the scale of potential savings together with 4E’s mission to consider topics that are not being addressed by other international collaborations justifies 4E’s investment of time and effort in finding solutions.

1 See IEA 4E Achievements of Energy Efficiency Appliance and Equipment Standards and Labelling Programmes: A Global Assessment in 2021 https://iea.blob.core.windows.net/assets/996ea40e-e010-48c3-ab53-9b4f72ddc815/AchievementsofEnergyEfficiencyApplianceandEquipmentStandardsandLabellingProgrammes.pdf

In 2022, 4E published ‘Progressing Energy Efficiency Policies for Systems’, a summary of the work undertaken by 4E over the previous four years.This includes estimates of savings potential, options for overcoming some of the hurdles to regulation and the identification of system types that are most suitable for the next generation of energy efficiency regulation.

This work is ongoing and 4E welcomes interaction with others interested in investigating this topic more widely.

4E’s research published in 2022 shows that the potential energy savings from regulating energy-using systems could dwarf the already considerable savings made by regulating products. However, we have also studied the considerable legal, administrative, and technical barriers in depth, so we are aware of the difficulties ahead. However, the scale of potential savings together with 4E’s mission to consider topics that are not being addressed by other international collaborations justifies 4E’s investment of time and effort in finding solutions.

1 See IEA 4E Achievements of Energy Efficiency Appliance and Equipment Standards and Labelling Programmes: A Global Assessment in 2021 https://iea.blob.core.windows.net/assets/996ea40e-e010-48c3-ab53-9b4f72ddc815/AchievementsofEnergyEfficiencyApplianceandEquipmentStandardsandLabellingProgrammes.pdf

IEA Publications

4E works closely with the IEA and provides expert input to many reports, including combining on joint publications and events. This gives high level visibility to much of 4E’s research work.

4E makes a significant contribution to the appliance & equipment sections of the IEA’s annual flagship publications on energy efficiency and on digitalisation.

Further examples of collaborative work with the IEA and other TCPS are shown later in this report.

Every year the 4E TCP delivers important developments in the understanding of how to improve end-use energy efficiency and provides meaningful contributions to IEA work and several of its major publications. For example, the IEA’s flagship publication, Energy Efficiency 2022, cited 4E’s analysis of the energy consumption by systems and drew on other valuable 4E work. The value of our collaboration with 4E is particularly evident the field of Digitalisation, where the work of 4E continues to provide insights into the role this can play in encouraging energy systems to use energy more efficiently.

4E works closely with the IEA and provides expert input to many reports, including combining on joint publications and events. This gives high level visibility to much of 4E’s research work.

4E makes a significant contribution to the appliance & equipment sections of the IEA’s annual flagship publications on energy efficiency and on digitalisation.

Further examples of collaborative work with the IEA and other TCPS are shown later in this report.

Every year the 4E TCP delivers important developments in the understanding of how to improve end-use energy efficiency and provides meaningful contributions to IEA work and several of its major publications. For example, the IEA’s flagship publication, Energy Efficiency 2022, cited 4E’s analysis of the energy consumption by systems and drew on other valuable 4E work. The value of our collaboration with 4E is particularly evident the field of Digitalisation, where the work of 4E continues to provide insights into the role this can play in encouraging energy systems to use energy more efficiently.

Regulators Forum on Monitoring,
Verification and Enforcement (MV&E)

MV&E is a vital component of regulatory policies to ensure that expected energy efficiency gains are realised in practice. Building on the considerable experience of 4E Members and their national MV&E programmes, 4E provides a unique mechanism for regulators to raise issues of concern and share approaches to market surveillance and enforcement in confidence.

4E provides a unique forum for regulators to meet face-to-face alongside ExCo meetings to share information on topical issues relating to compliance and enforcement.

Regulators Forum on Monitoring,
Verification and Enforcement (MV&E)

MV&E is a vital component of regulatory policies to ensure that expected energy efficiency gains are realised in practice. Building on the considerable experience of 4E Members and their national MV&E programmes, 4E provides a unique mechanism for regulators to raise issues of concern and share approaches to market surveillance and enforcement in confidence.

4E provides a unique forum for regulators to meet face-to-face alongside ExCo meetings to share information on topical issues relating to compliance and enforcement.

Co-ordination with IEA and other organisations

Co-ordination with IEA and other organisations

As one of 38 Technology Collaboration Programmes established under the framework of the International Energy Agency (IEA), 4E has a particularly close relationship with the IEA Secretariat.

Some examples of collaborative activities in 2022 include:

  • 4E made a significant contribution to the IEA flagship publication ‘Energy Efficiency 2022’ 
  • 4E EDNA and the IEA’s 3DEN Initiative held webinars on:
    • ‘Interoperability of household appliances and equipment’, November 2022
    • ‘Blockchain applications: an energy perspective’, April 2022
  • The 4E Electric Motor Systems Annex participated in the expert panel on ‘Super-Efficient Appliances Pave the Way to Net-Zero’, which took place in the framework of the 7th Annual Global Conference on Energy Efficiency, June 2022 in Sønderborg, Denmark
  • The IEA’s Energy Efficiency Division provides a report to each meeting of the 4E Executive Committee and participates in discussions at these meetings 

4E also regularly liaises with other Technology Collaboration Programmes

4E and Industry

4E has extensive contact with a variety of industry organisations and companies. We run regular workshops to gain industry input to 4E’s work. These tend to focus on private sector companies related to our workstreams, such as suppliers of motor systems, solid state lighting, power electronics, ICT equipment and air conditioning.

Although some of the face-to-face interactions have been curtailed as a result of Covid, 4E has increased the number of Webinars that it runs during 2022, usually in collaboration with the IEA, and these continue to attract many hundreds of industry participants spanning a variety of technology and policy topics.

Depending on the topic, we may also seek industry comments on our published materials or conduct formal consultation processes. 4E Members also participate in many formal standardisation processes, contributing to the results of work undertaken by 4E, which has often been commissioned specially to inform standards development.

Doubling the rate of global energy intensity improvement from the 2% per year achieved from 2010 to 2020 to just over 4% from 2020-30 is necessary to put the world on a pathway consistent with the Net Zero Scenario. Doing so will require enhanced action on a wide spectrum of energy efficiency and demand-side measures covering technical efficiency, behaviour change and electrification, as well as material efficiency, digitalisation and fuel switching in industry.

As one of 38 Technology Collaboration Programmes established under the framework of the International Energy Agency (IEA), 4E has a particularly close relationship with the IEA Secretariat.

Some examples of collaborative activities in 2021 include:

  • 4E made a significant contribution to the IEA flagship publication ‘Energy Efficiency 2022’ 
  • 4E EDNA and the IEA’s 3DEN Initiative held webinars on:
    • ‘Interoperability of household appliances and equipment’, November 2022
    • ‘Blockchain applications: an energy perspective’, April 2022
  • The 4E Electric Motor Systems Annex participated in the expert panel on ‘Super-Efficient Appliances Pave the Way to Net-Zero’, which took place in the framework of the 7th Annual Global Conference on Energy Efficiency, June 2022 in Sønderborg, Denmark
  • The IEA’s Energy Efficiency Division provides a report to each meeting of the 4E Executive Committee and participates in discussions at these meetings 

4E also regularly liaises with other Technology Collaboration Programmes

4E and Industry

4E has extensive contact with a variety of industry organisations and companies. We run regular workshops to gain industry input to 4E’s work. These tend to focus on private sector companies related to our workstreams, such as suppliers of motor systems, solid state lighting, power electronics, ICT equipment and air conditioning.

Although some of the face-to-face interactions have been curtailed as a result of Covid, 4E has increased the number of Webinars that it runs during 2022, usually in collaboration with the IEA, and these continue to attract many hundreds of industry participants spanning a variety of technology and policy topics.

Depending on the topic, we may also seek industry comments on our published materials or conduct formal consultation processes. 4E Members also participate in many formal standardisation processes, contributing to the results of work undertaken by 4E, which has often been commissioned specially to inform standards development.

Doubling the rate of global energy intensity improvement from the 2% per year achieved from 2010 to 2020 to just over 4% from 2020-30 is necessary to put the world on a pathway consistent with the Net Zero Scenario. Doing so will require enhanced action on a wide spectrum of energy efficiency and demand-side measures covering technical efficiency, behaviour change and electrification, as well as material efficiency, digitalisation and fuel switching in industry.

Intergovernmental and Standardisation Organisations

4E engages continuously with a range of intergovernmental organisations, including but not limited to:

  • The Energy Efficiency Hub – particularly the Digitalisation Working Group
  • The Clean Energy Ministerial – particularly through the IEA and SEAD
  • The Super-Efficient Equipment and Appliances Deployment (SEAD)
  • United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) – particularly through United for Efficiency (U4E)
  • International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO)

Annex Achievements in 2022

Governments should embed connectivity and smart functionality requirements as part of minimum energy performance standards for high-consuming devices, such as air conditioners, heating systems, heat pumps, water boilers and electric vehicle charging, and include these requirements in energy efficiency standards for buildings. This would also unlock opportunities for private charging infrastructure to provide grid services and act as a responsive distributed energy resource. The adoption of future-ready devices and systems can also be supported by providing incentives to consumers in the form of rewards.

EMSA provides policy guidance to members and other governments aimed at improving the energy efficiency of electric motor driven systems, delivering energy savings in their markets. EMSA’s activities involve stakeholders from research, government, industry and NGOs. EMSA works on:

  • Providing evidence-based information to advance the development of co-ordinated global standards for testing and the efficiency classification of motors and motor systems
  • Collecting best policy practices and providing guidance in the development and implementation of regulations and policy programmes
  • Providing independent, up-to-date resources and tools, such as the Motor Systems Tool, ready for uptake in policy implementation
  • Raising awareness of energy savings potential and providing information on the latest policy and technology developments of electric motor systems.

The contribution of EMSA to increased energy savings is unique thanks to its organisational setup and the collaborative effort of its members: regulators in governments, who are working with national experts in standardisation committees or technical and other experts. The work of EMSA strongly complements not only the work of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), International Standardisation Organisation (ISO) amongst others, but also of other international non-governmental organisations who seek expert input on specific issues by EMSA.

EMSA works within a global network with representatives from industry, research, academia and government and provides a platform for in-depth technical and policy exchange between members and is a partner for collaborative projects.

Annex Participants

EMSA provides policy guidance to members and other governments aimed at improving the energy efficiency of electric motor driven systems, delivering energy savings in their markets. EMSA’s activities involve stakeholders from research, government, industry and NGOs. EMSA works on:

  • Providing evidence-based information to advance the development of co-ordinated global standards for testing and the efficiency classification of motors and motor systems
  • Collecting best policy practices and providing guidance in the development and implementation of regulations and policy programmes
  • Providing independent, up-to-date resources and tools, such as the Motor Systems Tool, ready for uptake in policy implementation
  • Raising awareness of energy savings potential and providing information on the latest policy and technology developments of electric motor systems.

The contribution of EMSA to increased energy savings is unique thanks to its organisational setup and the collaborative effort of its members: regulators in governments, who are working with national experts in standardisation committees or technical and other experts. The work of EMSA strongly complements not only the work of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), International Standardisation Organisation (ISO) amongst others, but also of other international non-governmental organisations who seek expert input on specific issues by EMSA.

EMSA works within a global network with representatives from industry, research, academia and government and provides a platform for in-depth technical and policy exchange between members and is a partner for collaborative projects.

Annex Participants

Major Achievements During 2022

The EMSA project ‘Round Robin for Converter Losses’ was concluded in 2022. This international testing campaign was implemented in co-operation with the IEC and independent testing laboratories between 2017 and 2022. It is the first independent publicly available study to systematically analyse the electric losses and efficiency of converters. The modifications included in the Round Robin Uniform Testing Protocol were incorporated in the second revision of IEC 61800-9-2. The Round Robin showed that almost all converters on the market easily reach the most efficient (IE2) class. These outcomes underline the importance of EMSA’s independent, evidence-based voice in international standardisation.

Figure 3: IE-index for 3-phase Basic Drive Modules over nominal output current at (90:100) duty point. Dotted line is the threshold between IE2 (below the line) and IE1 (above the line). Orange crosses: without filter, blue crosses: with filter.

The joint working group JAG 22, that was established as a result of EMSA’s initiative, has begun to integrate relevant materials from IEC electric motor and converter standards into an ISO fan standard. As a result, it will be possible to make more precise calculations for each operating condition as deemed necessary for each type of application.

A small-scale Round Robin for air compressors has been launched which aims to develop and trial a guide to the air compressor energy efficiency measurement method. Eventually the results will be used to modify the ISO test standard.

EMSA published the report ‘Classification of digitalisation technologies for electric motor driven systems’. The report is a stepping stone for further work analysing possibilities for increased energy efficiency through the digitalisation of motor systems.

Some of the key digital technologies assessed in the report that enable energy efficiency in motor driven systems during the use phase are shown below.

Technologies associated with energy efficiency, digitalisation and motor systems

EMSA has worked on improving the user support of the Motor Systems Tool by establishing an expert pool to address questions from users. The tool was also extended with loss models from the ANSI/AMCA Standard 207-17. All these efforts contribute to making the tool even more suitable for uptake into national policies; for example, New Zealand is currently running a pilot using the Motor Systems Tool for selected industrial sites.

EMSA has worked on improving the user support of the Motor Systems Tool by establishing an expert pool to address questions from users. The tool was also extended with loss models from the ANSI/AMCA Standard 207-17. All these efforts contribute to making the tool even more suitable for uptake into national policies; for example, New Zealand is currently running a pilot using the Motor Systems Tool for selected industrial sites.

Solid State Lighting technology can cut lighting electricity consumption in half or more. Now in our 13th year, the SSL Annex continues to focus on four critical areas of work: 
  • SSL product quality and performance;
  • SSL testing, metrics and standards;
  • Health, productivity and environmental impacts; and 
  • Smart lighting, digitalisation and connectivity. 
All these activities are policy-driven with a focus on how to best implement policy and standards. This work complements academic research, international standardisation and R&D conducted by industry.  
For an individual government, few have the resources to replicate these tasks, or facilitate the information exchange and knowledge transfer that occurs within the SSL Annex. The body of work is carried out primarily through members’ in-kind contributions, with part of the work contracted to experts when necessary.  
 
The SSL Annex provides information and analysis that is highly relevant for current regulatory processes in several countries, as well as for international standardisation work in which several Member governments are engaged. 
 
Testing continues to be a key focus area. The SSL Annex completed the world’s largest interlaboratory comparison for goniophotometers, holding two public webinars in January 2022. The work to compare nucleus labs for a new interlaboratory comparison of methods to test light modulation has now begun. 
 
The performance of SSL products remains important, and the Annex’s quality and performance recommendations were published in early Q2 2022.

Annex Participants

Canada withdrew during 2022

Solid State Lighting technology can cut lighting electricity consumption in half or more. Now in our 13th year, the SSL Annex continues to focus on four critical areas of work: 
  • SSL product quality and performance;
  • SSL testing, metrics and standards;
  • Health, productivity and environmental impacts; and 
  • Smart lighting, digitalisation and connectivity. 
All these activities are policy-driven with a focus on how to best implement policy and standards. This work complements academic research, international standardisation and R&D conducted by industry.  
For an individual government, few have the resources to replicate these tasks, or facilitate the information exchange and knowledge transfer that occurs within the SSL Annex. The body of work is carried out primarily through members’ in-kind contributions, with part of the work contracted to experts when necessary.  
 
The SSL Annex provides information and analysis that is highly relevant for current regulatory processes in several countries, as well as for international standardisation work in which several Member governments are engaged. 
 
Testing continues to be a key focus area. The SSL Annex completed the world’s largest interlaboratory comparison for goniophotometers, holding two public webinars in January 2022. The work to compare nucleus labs for a new interlaboratory comparison of methods to test light modulation has now begun. 
 
The performance of SSL products remains important, and the Annex’s quality and performance recommendations were published in early Q2 2022.

Annex Participants

Canada withdrew during 2022

Major Achievements During 2022

Updated LED quality and performance requirements for global use were published in October 2022. The requirements account for projected performance improvements in the coming years and can be used for regulations, programme requirements and procurement criteria. This work constitutes an important data and experience sharing process to be used by Annex Members in their regular policy work as well as for any lighting market transformation programme design.

Updated LED quality and performance requirements for global use were published in October 2022. The requirements account for projected performance improvements in the coming years and can be used for regulations, programme requirements and procurement criteria. This work constitutes an important data and experience sharing process to be used by Annex Members in their regular policy work as well as for any lighting market transformation programme design.

Interlaboratory Comparison: Two public webinars were held with over 200 participants from around the world on the final IC 2017 (goniphotometer) report. 
 
Lifetime testing: Two public webinars were held with over 130 participants from around the world.
 
Interlaboratory Comparison: Two public webinars were held with over 200 participants from around the world on the final IC 2017 (goniphotometer) report. 
 
Lifetime testing: Two public webinars were held with over 130 participants from around the world.
 

Over 20 laboratories in 12 countries expressed interest in participating in the Interlaboratory Comparison on Temporal Light Modulation (IC2022). IC2022 will evaluate methods to test temporal light modulation (“flicker”). This work is expected to ultimately improve the accuracy of testing while simultaneously lowering testing costs for laboratories and governments.

Over 20 laboratories in 12 countries expressed interest in participating in the Interlaboratory Comparison on Temporal Light Modulation (IC2022). IC2022 will evaluate methods to test temporal light modulation (“flicker”). This work is expected to ultimately improve the accuracy of testing while simultaneously lowering testing costs for laboratories and governments.

A second major report on smart lighting products was published, focusing on features that impact energy consumption. The report provides a comprehensive overview on various features, based on real-life test data. It offers advice to stakeholders on important issues to consider in order to maximise the savings potential of smart lighting products.

The EDNA Annex is focussed on the energy aspects of smart devices and associated networks.  There is significant potential for internet-connected equipment to save energy, by way of remote controllability, cloud control and smart algorithms. Controllability also allows connected devices to be operated so that they become useful for the electricity grid. For example, at times of high power demand, certain devices can be de-prioritised, and at times of high power generation (e.g. during sunny weather) devices can be turned on to ‘soak up’ excess solar energy. This ‘demand flexibility’ is increasingly important as renewable energy sources play a larger role in the power grid. EDNA research on this topic led to several publications in 2022, along with a report dealing with the energy that connected devices use to stay connected to the internet.

Alongside these topics, EDNA has commenced a workstream on data centres. Data centres are an integral part of the smart device ecosystem, and consume considerable amounts of energy. In 2022 EDNA produced a report on energy efficiency metrics for data centres, and has several more studies in the pipeline, all aimed at policy makers who wish to influence the energy consumption of data centres.

EDNA is uniquely positioned to affect change in these areas, as its members are government policy makers who are committed to collaborating in order to share knowledge and reduce costs. EDNA also works closely with other organisations such as the IEA, the Connected Devices Alliance, the Users TCP and the newly-formed Energy Efficiency Hub. With these partners EDNA has undertaken collaborations and held joint public webinars in order to disseminate our work. 

Annex Participants

The EDNA Annex is focussed on the energy aspects of smart devices and associated networks.  There is significant potential for internet-connected equipment to save energy, by way of remote controllability, cloud control and smart algorithms. Controllability also allows connected devices to be operated so that they become useful for the electricity grid. For example, at times of high power demand, certain devices can be de-prioritised, and at times of high power generation (e.g. during sunny weather) devices can be turned on to ‘soak up’ excess solar energy. This ‘demand flexibility’ is increasingly important as renewable energy sources play a larger role in the power grid. EDNA research on this topic led to several publications in 2022, along with a report dealing with the energy that connected devices use to stay connected to the internet.

Alongside these topics, EDNA has commenced a workstream on data centres. Data centres are an integral part of the smart device ecosystem, and consume considerable amounts of energy. In 2022 EDNA produced a report on energy efficiency metrics for data centres, and has several more studies in the pipeline, all aimed at policy makers who wish to influence the energy consumption of data centres.

EDNA is uniquely positioned to affect change in these areas, as its members are government policy makers who are committed to collaborating in order to share knowledge and reduce costs. EDNA also works closely with other organisations such as the IEA, the Connected Devices Alliance, the Users TCP and the newly-formed Energy Efficiency Hub. With these partners EDNA has undertaken collaborations and held joint public webinars in order to disseminate our work. 

Annex Participants

Major Achievements During 2022

In 2022 EDNA published 3 reports and 1 policy brief that dealt with the energy consumed by smart devices. These covered topics such as emerging battery technologies, the efficiency of battery-powered devices themselves, standardisation for smart devices and the energy efficiency of small network equipment such as routers.

In 2022 EDNA published 3 reports and 1 policy brief that dealt with the energy consumed by smart devices. These covered topics such as emerging battery technologies, the efficiency of battery-powered devices themselves, standardisation for smart devices and the energy efficiency of small network equipment such as routers.

In 2022 EDNA published 3 reports and 1 policy brief that dealt with the energy consumed by smart devices. These covered topics such as emerging battery technologies, the efficiency of battery-powered devices themselves, standardisation for smart devices and the energy efficiency of small network equipment such as routers.

In the field of demand flexibility, EDNA published 2 reports. The first deals with the ‘application layer’ protocols that devices use to communicate, in particular when communicating with the power grid in order to provide demand flexibility.  Standardising these protocols is essential to ensure that devices are ready to provide grid services in future. The second report dealt with a related topic – interoperability. Interoperability is the ability for devices not only to communicate with the grid, but with each other, which is vital if the energy saving and demand flexibility opportunities offered by smart devices are to be capitalised on. Following publication of the report, EDNA hosted a webinar with the IEA on this topic. 

In the field of demand flexibility, EDNA published 2 reports. The first deals with the ‘application layer’ protocols that devices use to communicate, in particular when communicating with the power grid in order to provide demand flexibility.  Standardising these protocols is essential to ensure that devices are ready to provide grid services in future. The second report dealt with a related topic – interoperability. Interoperability is the ability for devices not only to communicate with the grid, but with each other, which is vital if the energy saving and demand flexibility opportunities offered by smart devices are to be capitalised on. Following publication of the report, EDNA hosted a webinar with the IEA on this topic. 

In 2022 EDNA also commenced a workstream on data centres. Data centres consume enormous amounts of energy, as the consumption of data by consumers continues to increase steeply. Developing energy policy in this area is notoriously difficult, and EDNA has begun to contribute by publishing a report on energy efficiency metrics for data centres, and one on data centres trends and the information required for policy making. EDNA also published a policy brief on the energy consumption of blockchain, and hosted a webinar with the IEA on this fascinating topic.

In 2022 EDNA also commenced a workstream on data centres. Data centres consume enormous amounts of energy, as the consumption of data by consumers continues to increase steeply. Developing energy policy in this area is notoriously difficult, and EDNA has begun to contribute by publishing a report on energy efficiency metrics for data centres, and one on data centres trends and the information required for policy making. EDNA also published a policy brief on the energy consumption of blockchain, and hosted a webinar with the IEA on this fascinating topic.

In 2022 EDNA also commenced a workstream on data centres. Data centres consume enormous amounts of energy, as the consumption of data by consumers continues to increase steeply. Developing energy policy in this area is notoriously difficult, and EDNA has begun to contribute by publishing a report on energy efficiency metrics for data centres, and one on data centres trends and the information required for policy making. EDNA also published a policy brief on the energy consumption of blockchain, and hosted a webinar with the IEA on this fascinating topic.

The Power Electronic Conversion Technology Annex (PECTA) focuses on investigating the efficiency potential of new semiconductor technologies in power electronic applications, particularly in the area of wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors such as silicon-carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN).

These WBG semiconductors are expected to have better material characteristics compared to traditional silicon-based components and could lead to energy savings in a wide range of power electronics applications.

Through research, PECTA aims to identify the energy efficiency savings outlook from the adoption of WBG components in different applications, and to develop a roadmap for their market adoption in relevant fields. PECTA also conducts a life cycle assessment (LCA) of WBG devices to evaluate their energy consumption during the manufacturing process.

By bringing together academia, industry, and policymakers, PECTA creates a platform for knowledge sharing and collaboration to explore the potential energy efficiency improvements from adopting WBG materials in market-ready products. The unique approach of PECTA creates new insights and perspectives, not only for the scientific community, but also for stakeholders in different fields from component design to system manufacturing.

PECTA is unique in its approach of bringing together academia, industry, and policymakers to explore the potential of WBG semiconductors in power electronics applications. The industry advisory group within PECTA ensures that the research is relevant to industry needs and the development of new technologies. In addition, PECTA collaborates with other organisations such as the European Centre for Power Electronics (ECPE) to create a broader knowledge-sharing network.

The focus on energy efficiency and environmental impacts sets PECTA apart from other initiatives in the power electronics field, and its research contributes to the global effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. PECTA’s work is also complementary to the work of other organisations focused on power electronics, such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), which develops standards for power electronics components and systems. By working together with other stakeholders, Annexes or technology programmes, PECTA contributes to the development and adoption of more energy-efficient technologies and promotes sustainable practices in the power electronics industry.

Annex Participants

Annex Observers

The Power Electronic Conversion Technology Annex (PECTA) focuses on investigating the efficiency potential of new semiconductor technologies in power electronic applications, particularly in the area of wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors such as silicon-carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN).

These WBG semiconductors are expected to have better material characteristics compared to traditional silicon-based components and could lead to energy savings in a wide range of power electronics applications.

Through research, PECTA aims to identify the energy efficiency savings outlook from the adoption of WBG components in different applications, and to develop a roadmap for their market adoption in relevant fields. PECTA also conducts a life cycle assessment (LCA) of WBG devices to evaluate their energy consumption during the manufacturing process.

By bringing together academia, industry, and policymakers, PECTA creates a platform for knowledge sharing and collaboration to explore the potential energy efficiency improvements from adopting WBG materials in market-ready products. The unique approach of PECTA creates new insights and perspectives, not only for the scientific community, but also for stakeholders in different fields from component design to system manufacturing.

PECTA is unique in its approach of bringing together academia, industry, and policymakers to explore the potential of WBG semiconductors in power electronics applications. The industry advisory group within PECTA ensures that the research is relevant to industry needs and the development of new technologies. In addition, PECTA collaborates with other organisations such as the European Centre for Power Electronics (ECPE) to create a broader knowledge-sharing network.

The focus on energy efficiency and environmental impacts sets PECTA apart from other initiatives in the power electronics field, and its research contributes to the global effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. PECTA’s work is also complementary to the work of other organisations focused on power electronics, such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), which develops standards for power electronics components and systems. By working together with other stakeholders, Annexes or technology programmes, PECTA contributes to the development and adoption of more energy-efficient technologies and promotes sustainable practices in the power electronics industry.

Annex Participants

Annex Observers

Major Achievements During 2022

PECTA has focussed on applications with significant energy saving potential during 2022.  For example:
  • A new Task (Task G) to identify the potential energy savings if PV inverter would be upgraded from Silicon to Silicon-Carbide technology or from hybrid to full-SiC was initiated by Austria and Switzerland.
  • The results of two different Tasks (B and F) have been combined to identify potential savings over the operational lifetime of a low wattage laptop and/or cell phone charger.
PECTA has focussed on applications with significant energy saving potential during 2022.  For example:
  • A new Task (Task G) to identify the potential energy savings if PV inverter would be upgraded from Silicon to Silicon-Carbide technology or from hybrid to full-SiC was initiated by Austria and Switzerland.
  • The results of two different Tasks (B and F) have been combined to identify potential savings over the operational lifetime of a low wattage laptop and/or cell phone charger.
PECTA has focussed on applications with significant energy saving potential during 2022.  For example:
  • A new Task (Task G) to identify the potential energy savings if PV inverter would be upgraded from Silicon to Silicon-Carbide technology or from hybrid to full-SiC was initiated by Austria and Switzerland.
  • The results of two different Tasks (B and F) have been combined to identify potential savings over the operational lifetime of a low wattage laptop and/or cell phone charger.

PECTA has expanded its network of experts from Academia and Industry joined PECTA during 2022. This not only increases its effectiveness, but has enhanced PECTA’s standing with power electronics associations and the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council (JEDEC).

PECTA has expanded its network of experts from Academia and Industry joined PECTA during 2022. This not only increases its effectiveness, but has enhanced PECTA’s standing with power electronics associations and the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council (JEDEC).

PECTA’s work is highly relevant for other 4E Annexes and IEA TCPs, such as PV, wind, Hybrid and electric vehicles, and is establishing linkages with these.

PECTA’s work is highly relevant for other 4E Annexes and IEA TCPs, such as PV, wind, Hybrid and electric vehicles, and is establishing linkages with these.

Interim results have been communicated via an expanded range of channels, and presentations have been made to key conferences. Several additional conference publications and reports are planned for 2023 and will include results and findings of the different Tasks.

Annex Achievements in 2022

Governments should embed connectivity and smart functionality requirements as part of minimum energy performance standards for high-consuming devices, such as air conditioners, heating systems, heat pumps, water boilers and electric vehicle charging, and include these requirements in energy efficiency standards for buildings. This would also unlock opportunities for private charging infrastructure to provide grid services and act as a responsive distributed energy resource. The adoption of future-ready devices and systems can also be supported by providing incentives to consumers in the form of rewards.

EMSA provides policy guidance to members and other governments aimed at improving the energy efficiency of electric motor driven systems, delivering energy savings in their markets. EMSA’s activities involve stakeholders from research, government, industry and NGOs. EMSA works on:

  • Providing evidence-based information to advance the development of co-ordinated global standards for testing and the efficiency classification of motors and motor systems
  • Collecting best policy practices and providing guidance in the development and implementation of regulations and policy programmes
  • Providing independent, up-to-date resources and tools, such as the Motor Systems Tool, ready for uptake in policy implementation
  • Raising awareness of energy savings potential and providing information on the latest policy and technology developments of electric motor systems.

The contribution of EMSA to increased energy savings is unique thanks to its organisational setup and the collaborative effort of its members: regulators in governments, who are working with national experts in standardisation committees or technical and other experts. The work of EMSA strongly complements not only the work of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), International Standardisation Organisation (ISO) amongst others, but also of other international non-governmental organisations who seek expert input on specific issues by EMSA.

EMSA works within a global network with representatives from industry, research, academia and government and provides a platform for in-depth technical and policy exchange between members and is a partner for collaborative projects.

Annex Participants

EMSA provides policy guidance to members and other governments aimed at improving the energy efficiency of electric motor driven systems, delivering energy savings in their markets. EMSA’s activities involve stakeholders from research, government, industry and NGOs. EMSA works on:

  • Providing evidence-based information to advance the development of co-ordinated global standards for testing and the efficiency classification of motors and motor systems
  • Collecting best policy practices and providing guidance in the development and implementation of regulations and policy programmes
  • Providing independent, up-to-date resources and tools, such as the Motor Systems Tool, ready for uptake in policy implementation
  • Raising awareness of energy savings potential and providing information on the latest policy and technology developments of electric motor systems.

The contribution of EMSA to increased energy savings is unique thanks to its organisational setup and the collaborative effort of its members: regulators in governments, who are working with national experts in standardisation committees or technical and other experts. The work of EMSA strongly complements not only the work of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), International Standardisation Organisation (ISO) amongst others, but also of other international non-governmental organisations who seek expert input on specific issues by EMSA.

EMSA works within a global network with representatives from industry, research, academia and government and provides a platform for in-depth technical and policy exchange between members and is a partner for collaborative projects.

Annex Participants

Major Achievements During 2022

The EMSA project ‘Round Robin for Converter Losses’ was concluded in 2022. This international testing campaign was implemented in co-operation with the IEC and independent testing laboratories between 2017 and 2022. It is the first independent publicly available study to systematically analyse the electric losses and efficiency of converters. The modifications included in the Round Robin Uniform Testing Protocol were incorporated in the second revision of IEC 61800-9-2. The Round Robin showed that almost all converters on the market easily reach the most efficient (IE2) class. These outcomes underline the importance of EMSA’s independent, evidence-based voice in international standardisation.

Figure 3: IE-index for 3-phase Basic Drive Modules over nominal output current at (90:100) duty point. Dotted line is the threshold between IE2 (below the line) and IE1 (above the line). Orange crosses: without filter, blue crosses: with filter.

The joint working group JAG 22, that was established as a result of EMSA’s initiative, has begun to integrate relevant materials from IEC electric motor and converter standards into an ISO fan standard. As a result, it will be possible to make more precise calculations for each operating condition as deemed necessary for each type of application.

A small-scale Round Robin for air compressors has been launched which aims to develop and trial a guide to the air compressor energy efficiency measurement method. Eventually the results will be used to modify the ISO test standard.

EMSA published the report ‘Classification of digitalisation technologies for electric motor driven systems’. The report is a stepping stone for further work analysing possibilities for increased energy efficiency through the digitalisation of motor systems.

Some of the key digital technologies assessed in the report that enable energy efficiency in motor driven systems during the use phase are shown below.

Technologies associated with energy efficiency, digitalisation and motor systems

EMSA has worked on improving the user support of the Motor Systems Tool by establishing an expert pool to address questions from users. The tool was also extended with loss models from the ANSI/AMCA Standard 207-17. All these efforts contribute to making the tool even more suitable for uptake into national policies; for example, New Zealand is currently running a pilot using the Motor Systems Tool for selected industrial sites.

EMSA has worked on improving the user support of the Motor Systems Tool by establishing an expert pool to address questions from users. The tool was also extended with loss models from the ANSI/AMCA Standard 207-17. All these efforts contribute to making the tool even more suitable for uptake into national policies; for example, New Zealand is currently running a pilot using the Motor Systems Tool for selected industrial sites.

Solid State Lighting technology can cut lighting electricity consumption in half or more. Now in our 13th year, the SSL Annex continues to focus on four critical areas of work: 
  • SSL product quality and performance;
  • SSL testing, metrics and standards;
  • Health, productivity and environmental impacts; and 
  • Smart lighting, digitalisation and connectivity. 
All these activities are policy-driven with a focus on how to best implement policy and standards. This work complements academic research, international standardisation and R&D conducted by industry.  
For an individual government, few have the resources to replicate these tasks, or facilitate the information exchange and knowledge transfer that occurs within the SSL Annex. The body of work is carried out primarily through members’ in-kind contributions, with part of the work contracted to experts when necessary.  
 
The SSL Annex provides information and analysis that is highly relevant for current regulatory processes in several countries, as well as for international standardisation work in which several Member governments are engaged. 
 
Testing continues to be a key focus area. The SSL Annex completed the world’s largest interlaboratory comparison for goniophotometers, holding two public webinars in January 2022. The work to compare nucleus labs for a new interlaboratory comparison of methods to test light modulation has now begun. 
 
The performance of SSL products remains important, and the Annex’s quality and performance recommendations were published in early Q2 2022.

Annex Participants

Canada withdrew during 2022

Solid State Lighting technology can cut lighting electricity consumption in half or more. Now in our 13th year, the SSL Annex continues to focus on four critical areas of work: 
  • SSL product quality and performance;
  • SSL testing, metrics and standards;
  • Health, productivity and environmental impacts; and 
  • Smart lighting, digitalisation and connectivity. 
All these activities are policy-driven with a focus on how to best implement policy and standards. This work complements academic research, international standardisation and R&D conducted by industry.  
For an individual government, few have the resources to replicate these tasks, or facilitate the information exchange and knowledge transfer that occurs within the SSL Annex. The body of work is carried out primarily through members’ in-kind contributions, with part of the work contracted to experts when necessary.  
 
The SSL Annex provides information and analysis that is highly relevant for current regulatory processes in several countries, as well as for international standardisation work in which several Member governments are engaged. 
 
Testing continues to be a key focus area. The SSL Annex completed the world’s largest interlaboratory comparison for goniophotometers, holding two public webinars in January 2022. The work to compare nucleus labs for a new interlaboratory comparison of methods to test light modulation has now begun. 
 
The performance of SSL products remains important, and the Annex’s quality and performance recommendations were published in early Q2 2022.

Annex Participants

Canada withdrew during 2022

Major Achievements During 2022

Updated LED quality and performance requirements for global use were published in October 2022. The requirements account for projected performance improvements in the coming years and can be used for regulations, programme requirements and procurement criteria. This work constitutes an important data and experience sharing process to be used by Annex Members in their regular policy work as well as for any lighting market transformation programme design.

Updated LED quality and performance requirements for global use were published in October 2022. The requirements account for projected performance improvements in the coming years and can be used for regulations, programme requirements and procurement criteria. This work constitutes an important data and experience sharing process to be used by Annex Members in their regular policy work as well as for any lighting market transformation programme design.

Interlaboratory Comparison: Two public webinars were held with over 200 participants from around the world on the final IC 2017 (goniphotometer) report. 
 
Lifetime testing: Two public webinars were held with over 130 participants from around the world.
 
Interlaboratory Comparison: Two public webinars were held with over 200 participants from around the world on the final IC 2017 (goniphotometer) report. 
 
Lifetime testing: Two public webinars were held with over 130 participants from around the world.
 

Over 20 laboratories in 12 countries expressed interest in participating in the Interlaboratory Comparison on Temporal Light Modulation (IC2022). IC2022 will evaluate methods to test temporal light modulation (“flicker”). This work is expected to ultimately improve the accuracy of testing while simultaneously lowering testing costs for laboratories and governments.

Over 20 laboratories in 12 countries expressed interest in participating in the Interlaboratory Comparison on Temporal Light Modulation (IC2022). IC2022 will evaluate methods to test temporal light modulation (“flicker”). This work is expected to ultimately improve the accuracy of testing while simultaneously lowering testing costs for laboratories and governments.

A second major report on smart lighting products was published, focusing on features that impact energy consumption. The report provides a comprehensive overview on various features, based on real-life test data. It offers advice to stakeholders on important issues to consider in order to maximise the savings potential of smart lighting products.

The EDNA Annex is focussed on the energy aspects of smart devices and associated networks.  There is significant potential for internet-connected equipment to save energy, by way of remote controllability, cloud control and smart algorithms. Controllability also allows connected devices to be operated so that they become useful for the electricity grid. For example, at times of high power demand, certain devices can be de-prioritised, and at times of high power generation (e.g. during sunny weather) devices can be turned on to ‘soak up’ excess solar energy. This ‘demand flexibility’ is increasingly important as renewable energy sources play a larger role in the power grid. EDNA research on this topic led to several publications in 2022, along with a report dealing with the energy that connected devices use to stay connected to the internet.

Alongside these topics, EDNA has commenced a workstream on data centres. Data centres are an integral part of the smart device ecosystem, and consume considerable amounts of energy. In 2022 EDNA produced a report on energy efficiency metrics for data centres, and has several more studies in the pipeline, all aimed at policy makers who wish to influence the energy consumption of data centres.

EDNA is uniquely positioned to affect change in these areas, as its members are government policy makers who are committed to collaborating in order to share knowledge and reduce costs. EDNA also works closely with other organisations such as the IEA, the Connected Devices Alliance, the Users TCP and the newly-formed Energy Efficiency Hub. With these partners EDNA has undertaken collaborations and held joint public webinars in order to disseminate our work. 

Annex Participants

The EDNA Annex is focussed on the energy aspects of smart devices and associated networks.  There is significant potential for internet-connected equipment to save energy, by way of remote controllability, cloud control and smart algorithms. Controllability also allows connected devices to be operated so that they become useful for the electricity grid. For example, at times of high power demand, certain devices can be de-prioritised, and at times of high power generation (e.g. during sunny weather) devices can be turned on to ‘soak up’ excess solar energy. This ‘demand flexibility’ is increasingly important as renewable energy sources play a larger role in the power grid. EDNA research on this topic led to several publications in 2022, along with a report dealing with the energy that connected devices use to stay connected to the internet.

Alongside these topics, EDNA has commenced a workstream on data centres. Data centres are an integral part of the smart device ecosystem, and consume considerable amounts of energy. In 2022 EDNA produced a report on energy efficiency metrics for data centres, and has several more studies in the pipeline, all aimed at policy makers who wish to influence the energy consumption of data centres.

EDNA is uniquely positioned to affect change in these areas, as its members are government policy makers who are committed to collaborating in order to share knowledge and reduce costs. EDNA also works closely with other organisations such as the IEA, the Connected Devices Alliance, the Users TCP and the newly-formed Energy Efficiency Hub. With these partners EDNA has undertaken collaborations and held joint public webinars in order to disseminate our work. 

Annex Participants

Major Achievements During 2022

In 2022 EDNA published 3 reports and 1 policy brief that dealt with the energy consumed by smart devices. These covered topics such as emerging battery technologies, the efficiency of battery-powered devices themselves, standardisation for smart devices and the energy efficiency of small network equipment such as routers.

In 2022 EDNA published 3 reports and 1 policy brief that dealt with the energy consumed by smart devices. These covered topics such as emerging battery technologies, the efficiency of battery-powered devices themselves, standardisation for smart devices and the energy efficiency of small network equipment such as routers.

In 2022 EDNA published 3 reports and 1 policy brief that dealt with the energy consumed by smart devices. These covered topics such as emerging battery technologies, the efficiency of battery-powered devices themselves, standardisation for smart devices and the energy efficiency of small network equipment such as routers.

In the field of demand flexibility, EDNA published 2 reports. The first deals with the ‘application layer’ protocols that devices use to communicate, in particular when communicating with the power grid in order to provide demand flexibility.  Standardising these protocols is essential to ensure that devices are ready to provide grid services in future. The second report dealt with a related topic – interoperability. Interoperability is the ability for devices not only to communicate with the grid, but with each other, which is vital if the energy saving and demand flexibility opportunities offered by smart devices are to be capitalised on. Following publication of the report, EDNA hosted a webinar with the IEA on this topic. 

In the field of demand flexibility, EDNA published 2 reports. The first deals with the ‘application layer’ protocols that devices use to communicate, in particular when communicating with the power grid in order to provide demand flexibility.  Standardising these protocols is essential to ensure that devices are ready to provide grid services in future. The second report dealt with a related topic – interoperability. Interoperability is the ability for devices not only to communicate with the grid, but with each other, which is vital if the energy saving and demand flexibility opportunities offered by smart devices are to be capitalised on. Following publication of the report, EDNA hosted a webinar with the IEA on this topic. 

In 2022 EDNA also commenced a workstream on data centres. Data centres consume enormous amounts of energy, as the consumption of data by consumers continues to increase steeply. Developing energy policy in this area is notoriously difficult, and EDNA has begun to contribute by publishing a report on energy efficiency metrics for data centres, and one on data centres trends and the information required for policy making. EDNA also published a policy brief on the energy consumption of blockchain, and hosted a webinar with the IEA on this fascinating topic.

In 2022 EDNA also commenced a workstream on data centres. Data centres consume enormous amounts of energy, as the consumption of data by consumers continues to increase steeply. Developing energy policy in this area is notoriously difficult, and EDNA has begun to contribute by publishing a report on energy efficiency metrics for data centres, and one on data centres trends and the information required for policy making. EDNA also published a policy brief on the energy consumption of blockchain, and hosted a webinar with the IEA on this fascinating topic.

In 2022 EDNA also commenced a workstream on data centres. Data centres consume enormous amounts of energy, as the consumption of data by consumers continues to increase steeply. Developing energy policy in this area is notoriously difficult, and EDNA has begun to contribute by publishing a report on energy efficiency metrics for data centres, and one on data centres trends and the information required for policy making. EDNA also published a policy brief on the energy consumption of blockchain, and hosted a webinar with the IEA on this fascinating topic.

The Power Electronic Conversion Technology Annex (PECTA) focuses on investigating the efficiency potential of new semiconductor technologies in power electronic applications, particularly in the area of wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors such as silicon-carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN).

These WBG semiconductors are expected to have better material characteristics compared to traditional silicon-based components and could lead to energy savings in a wide range of power electronics applications.

Through research, PECTA aims to identify the energy efficiency savings outlook from the adoption of WBG components in different applications, and to develop a roadmap for their market adoption in relevant fields. PECTA also conducts a life cycle assessment (LCA) of WBG devices to evaluate their energy consumption during the manufacturing process.

By bringing together academia, industry, and policymakers, PECTA creates a platform for knowledge sharing and collaboration to explore the potential energy efficiency improvements from adopting WBG materials in market-ready products. The unique approach of PECTA creates new insights and perspectives, not only for the scientific community, but also for stakeholders in different fields from component design to system manufacturing.

PECTA is unique in its approach of bringing together academia, industry, and policymakers to explore the potential of WBG semiconductors in power electronics applications. The industry advisory group within PECTA ensures that the research is relevant to industry needs and the development of new technologies. In addition, PECTA collaborates with other organisations such as the European Centre for Power Electronics (ECPE) to create a broader knowledge-sharing network.

The focus on energy efficiency and environmental impacts sets PECTA apart from other initiatives in the power electronics field, and its research contributes to the global effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. PECTA’s work is also complementary to the work of other organisations focused on power electronics, such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), which develops standards for power electronics components and systems. By working together with other stakeholders, Annexes or technology programmes, PECTA contributes to the development and adoption of more energy-efficient technologies and promotes sustainable practices in the power electronics industry.

Annex Participants

Annex Observers

The Power Electronic Conversion Technology Annex (PECTA) focuses on investigating the efficiency potential of new semiconductor technologies in power electronic applications, particularly in the area of wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors such as silicon-carbide (SiC) and gallium nitride (GaN).

These WBG semiconductors are expected to have better material characteristics compared to traditional silicon-based components and could lead to energy savings in a wide range of power electronics applications.

Through research, PECTA aims to identify the energy efficiency savings outlook from the adoption of WBG components in different applications, and to develop a roadmap for their market adoption in relevant fields. PECTA also conducts a life cycle assessment (LCA) of WBG devices to evaluate their energy consumption during the manufacturing process.

By bringing together academia, industry, and policymakers, PECTA creates a platform for knowledge sharing and collaboration to explore the potential energy efficiency improvements from adopting WBG materials in market-ready products. The unique approach of PECTA creates new insights and perspectives, not only for the scientific community, but also for stakeholders in different fields from component design to system manufacturing.

PECTA is unique in its approach of bringing together academia, industry, and policymakers to explore the potential of WBG semiconductors in power electronics applications. The industry advisory group within PECTA ensures that the research is relevant to industry needs and the development of new technologies. In addition, PECTA collaborates with other organisations such as the European Centre for Power Electronics (ECPE) to create a broader knowledge-sharing network.

The focus on energy efficiency and environmental impacts sets PECTA apart from other initiatives in the power electronics field, and its research contributes to the global effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. PECTA’s work is also complementary to the work of other organisations focused on power electronics, such as the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), which develops standards for power electronics components and systems. By working together with other stakeholders, Annexes or technology programmes, PECTA contributes to the development and adoption of more energy-efficient technologies and promotes sustainable practices in the power electronics industry.

Annex Participants

Annex Observers

Major Achievements During 2022

PECTA has focussed on applications with significant energy saving potential during 2022.  For example:
  • A new Task (Task G) to identify the potential energy savings if PV inverter would be upgraded from Silicon to Silicon-Carbide technology or from hybrid to full-SiC was initiated by Austria and Switzerland.
  • The results of two different Tasks (B and F) have been combined to identify potential savings over the operational lifetime of a low wattage laptop and/or cell phone charger.
PECTA has focussed on applications with significant energy saving potential during 2022.  For example:
  • A new Task (Task G) to identify the potential energy savings if PV inverter would be upgraded from Silicon to Silicon-Carbide technology or from hybrid to full-SiC was initiated by Austria and Switzerland.
  • The results of two different Tasks (B and F) have been combined to identify potential savings over the operational lifetime of a low wattage laptop and/or cell phone charger.
PECTA has focussed on applications with significant energy saving potential during 2022.  For example:
  • A new Task (Task G) to identify the potential energy savings if PV inverter would be upgraded from Silicon to Silicon-Carbide technology or from hybrid to full-SiC was initiated by Austria and Switzerland.
  • The results of two different Tasks (B and F) have been combined to identify potential savings over the operational lifetime of a low wattage laptop and/or cell phone charger.

PECTA has expanded its network of experts from Academia and Industry joined PECTA during 2022. This not only increases its effectiveness, but has enhanced PECTA’s standing with power electronics associations and the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council (JEDEC).

PECTA has expanded its network of experts from Academia and Industry joined PECTA during 2022. This not only increases its effectiveness, but has enhanced PECTA’s standing with power electronics associations and the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council (JEDEC).

PECTA’s work is highly relevant for other 4E Annexes and IEA TCPs, such as PV, wind, Hybrid and electric vehicles, and is establishing linkages with these.

PECTA’s work is highly relevant for other 4E Annexes and IEA TCPs, such as PV, wind, Hybrid and electric vehicles, and is establishing linkages with these.

Interim results have been communicated via an expanded range of channels, and presentations have been made to key conferences. Several additional conference publications and reports are planned for 2023 and will include results and findings of the different Tasks.

4E Outreach and Communication

4E uses a wide range of channels to reach its target audience, including technical reports, webinars, workshops, 2-page policy briefs, and newsletters.

4E Outreach and Communication

4E uses a wide range of channels to reach its target audience, including technical reports, webinars, workshops, 2-page policy briefs, and newsletters.

4E Outreach and Communication

4E uses a wide range of channels to reach its target audience, including technical reports, webinars, workshops, 2-page policy briefs, and newsletters.

4E Group Finances

4E Group Finances

In 2022, the total cost of 4E activities is estimated to be approximately €1.9 million.

4E activities are made possible through the contributions of member countries: taking the form of annual fees and substantial in-kind work by national experts. In 2022, the annual fees of the 15 Members funded 45% of the total expenditure.

The large majority of funding is directed towards our research activities. Approximately 15% of funds were used for communication, while only 7% were spent on administration and financial management, the same as in the previous year.

Around 10.9 million people were employed in energy efficiency in buildings and industry in 2019, with one-third of these jobs located in China, followed by around 2 million in North America.

In 2022, the total cost of 4E activities is estimated to be approximately €1.9 million.

4E activities are made possible through the contributions of member countries: taking the form of annual fees and substantial in-kind work by national experts. In 2022, the annual fees of the 15 Members funded 45% of the total expenditure.

The large majority of funding is directed towards our research activities. Approximately 15% of funds were used for communication, while only 7% were spent on administration and financial management, the same as in the previous year.

Around 10.9 million people were employed in energy efficiency in buildings and industry in 2019, with one-third of these jobs located in China, followed by around 2 million in North America.

4E membership fees, 2022

ExCo and Annex membership fees are set according to the agreed annual work programme and therefore may vary from year to year. However, the membership fees have not altered since 2016 and are considered by existing Members to represent excellent value for money. 

4E membership fees, 2022

ExCo and Annex membership fees are set according to the agreed annual work programme and therefore may vary from year to year. However, the membership fees have not altered since 2016 and are considered by existing Members to represent excellent value for money. 

Attachments

Australia

PRIMARY

Ms Melissa Cotterill
Manager, GEMS Policy & Legislation
Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water

Australia

PRIMARY

Ms Melissa Cotterill
Manager, GEMS Policy & Legislation
Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water

ALTERNATE

Ms Leonie Wilson
Assistant Manager, GEMS Policy & Legislation
Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water

ALTERNATE

Ms Leonie Wilson
Assistant Manager, GEMS Policy & Legislation
Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water

Austria

PRIMARY

Dr Adriana Diaz
Ecodesign Company GmbH
Engineering and Management Consultancy

Austria

PRIMARY

Dr Adriana Diaz
Ecodesign Company GmbH
Engineering and Management Consultancy

ALTERNATE

Mr Michael Hübner
Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology

ALTERNATE

Mr Michael Hübner
Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology

Canada

PRIMARY

Mr Jamie Hulan
Director, Equipment Division
Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resources Canada

Canada

PRIMARY

Mr Jamie Hulan
Director, Equipment Division
Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resources Canada

ALTERNATE

Ms Kimberly Curran
Chief, Standards Development,
Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resources Canada

ALTERNATE

Ms Kimberly Curran
Chief, Standards Development,
Office of Energy Efficiency, Natural Resources Canada

China

PRIMARY

Mr Lin Ling
Director of Resource and Environment
China National Institute of Standardizatio

China

PRIMARY

Mr Lin Ling
Director of Resource and Environment
China National Institute of Standardizatio

ALTERNATE

Mr Liu Meng
Associate Researcher
China National Institute of Standardization

ALTERNATE

Mr Liu Meng
Associate Researcher
China National Institute of Standardization

Denmark

PRIMARY

Mr Thore Stenfeldt
Advisor
Danish Energy Agency

Denmark

PRIMARY

Mr Thore Stenfeldt
Advisor
Danish Energy Agency

ALTERNATE

Mr Jakob Wulff Anderson
Advisor
Danish Energy Agency

ALTERNATE

Mr Jakob Wulff Anderson
Advisor
Danish Energy Agency

European
Commission

PRIMARY

Mr Niels Ladefoged
Directorate-General for Energy
European Commission

European
Commission

PRIMARY

Mr Niels Ladefoged
Directorate-General for Energy
European Commission

ALTERNATE

Mr Ronald Piers de Raveschoot
Directorate-General for Energy
European Commission

ALTERNATE

Mr Ronald Piers de Raveschoot
Directorate-General for Energy
European Commission

France

PRIMARY

Prof. Georges Zissis
Head of Light & Matter Research Group
Universite Toulouse III/LAPLACE

France

PRIMARY

Prof. Georges Zissis
Head of Light & Matter Research Group
Universite Toulouse III/LAPLACE

ALTERNATE

Ms Therese Kreitz
Responsible for International Affairs
ADEME

ALTERNATE

Ms Therese Kreitz
Responsible for International Affairs
ADEME

Japan

PRIMARY

Mr Mitsuru Hara
Director General, Head of First Technology Development Group, Energy Conservation Technology Department, NEDO

Japan

PRIMARY

Mr Mitsuru Hara
Director General, Head of First Technology Development Group, Energy Conservation Technology Department, NEDO

ALTERNATE

Dr Tohru Shimizu (from 1 February 2023)
Senior Researcher, Climate Change Policy Group
The Institute of Energy Economics (IEEJ)

ALTERNATE

Dr Tohru Shimizu (from 1 February 2023)
Senior Researcher, Climate Change Policy Group
The Institute of Energy Economics (IEEJ)

Korea

PRIMARY

Mr Sung-Bok Kim (from 1 Sept 2022)
Korea Energy Agency

Korea

PRIMARY

Mr Sung-Bok Kim (from 1 Sept 2022)
Korea Energy Agency

ALTERNATE

Ms Gyu-Ree Park (from 10 January 2023)
Korea Energy Agency

ALTERNATE

Ms Gyu-Ree Park (from 10 January 2023)
Korea Energy Agency

Netherlands

PRIMARY

Mr Hans-Paul Siderius (Co-Chair)
Senior Expert
Netherlands Enterprise Agency

Netherlands

PRIMARY

Mr Hans-Paul Siderius (Co-Chair)
Senior Expert
Netherlands Enterprise Agency

ALTERNATE

Ms Diandra D. van Duijn (from 1 Oct 2022)
Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy

ALTERNATE

Ms Diandra D. van Duijn (from 1 Oct 2022)
Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy

New Zealand

PRIMARY

Mr Brian Fitzgerald (Co-Chair)
Standards and Regulations
Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA)

New Zealand

PRIMARY

Mr Brian Fitzgerald (Co-Chair)
Standards and Regulations
Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority (EECA)

ALTERNATE

TBA

ALTERNATE

TBA

Sweden

PRIMARY

Dr Peter Bennich
Policy Officer, Energy Efficiency Department
The Swedish Energy Agency, Testlab

Sweden

PRIMARY

Dr Peter Bennich
Policy Officer, Energy Efficiency Department
The Swedish Energy Agency, Testlab

ALTERNATE

Mr Carlos Lopes
Coordinator for Ecodesign and Energy Labelling
The Swedish Energy Agency, Testlab

ALTERNATE

Mr Carlos Lopes
Coordinator for Ecodesign and Energy Labelling
The Swedish Energy Agency, Testlab

Switzerland

PRIMARY

Dr Michael Moser
Scientific Advisor, Energy Research Section
Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE)

Switzerland

PRIMARY

Dr Michael Moser
Scientific Advisor, Energy Research Section
Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE)

ALTERNATE

Mr Roland Brüniger
R. Brüniger AG
Consultant, Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE)

Dr Paul Stadler
Appliances and Competitive Tenders Section
Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE)

ALTERNATE

Mr Roland Brüniger
R. Brüniger AG
Consultant, Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE)

Dr Paul Stadler
Appliances and Competitive Tenders Section
Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE)

United Kingdom

PRIMARY

Ms Tara Deshpande
Deputy Director, Buildings and Electricity, Clean Heat Directorate
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

United Kingdom

PRIMARY

Ms Tara Deshpande
Deputy Director, Buildings and Electricity, Clean Heat Directorate
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

ALTERNATE

Ms Laura Gritt
Senior Policy Advisor, Energy-related Products Team
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

ALTERNATE

Ms Laura Gritt
Senior Policy Advisor, Energy-related Products Team
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

USA

PRIMARY

Mr Jeremy Dommu
Electronic Products Manager, Building Technologies Office, US Department of Energy

USA

PRIMARY

Mr Jeremy Dommu
Electronic Products Manager, Building Technologies Office, US Department of Energy

ALTERNATE

Mr John Cymbalsky (Vice-Chair)
Building Technologies Office
US Department of Energy

ALTERNATE

Mr John Cymbalsky (Vice-Chair)
Building Technologies Office
US Department of Energy

* At February 2023

January

EDNA

Policy Brief: Small Network Equipment

January

EDNA

Policy Brief: Small Network Equipment

PECTA

A “life cycle thinking” approach to assess differences in the energy use of SiC vs. Si power semiconductors

PECTA

A “life cycle thinking” approach to assess differences in the energy use of SiC vs. Si power semiconductors

March

EDNA

Policy Brief: Blockchain Energy Consumption

March

EDNA

Policy Brief: Blockchain Energy Consumption

April

EMSA

EMSA Newsletter*

April

EMSA

EMSA Newsletter*

4E

Annual Report

4E

Annual Report

May

SSL

Pre-announcement letter about Interlaboratory Comparison 2022: Temporal Light Modulation measurements

May

SSL

Pre-announcement letter about Interlaboratory Comparison 2022: Temporal Light Modulation measurements

June

EMSA

EMSA Newsflash**

June

EMSA

EMSA Newsflash**

EMSA

Policy Brief: Electric Motor Systems Annex Overview 2019-2024 (update)

EMSA

Policy Brief: Electric Motor Systems Annex Overview 2019-2024 (update)

EMSA

Classification of digitalisation technologies for electric motor driven systems

EMSA

Classification of digitalisation technologies for electric motor driven systems

July

4E

4E PEET Status of Domestic Refrigerator Regulations 2022

July

4E

4E PEET Status of Domestic Refrigerator Regulations 2022

4E

4E PEET Status of Television and Displays Regulations 2022

4E

4E PEET Status of Television and Displays Regulations 2022

4E

4E PEET Status of Room Air Conditioner Regulations 2022

4E

4E PEET Status of Room Air Conditioner Regulations 2022

4E

4E PEET Status of Electric Motor Regulations 2022

4E

4E PEET Status of Electric Motor Regulations 2022

4E

Progressing Energy Efficiency Policies for Systems

4E

Progressing Energy Efficiency Policies for Systems

August

EMSA

Policy Brief: Digital technologies for motor systems

August

EMSA

Policy Brief: Digital technologies for motor systems

September

SSL

Technology and innovation pathways for zero-carbon-ready buildings by 2030. A strategic vision from the IEA Technology Collaboration Programmes: SSL Chapter

September

SSL

Technology and innovation pathways for zero-carbon-ready buildings by 2030. A strategic vision from the IEA Technology Collaboration Programmes: SSL Chapter

October

SSL

IEA 4E SSL Annex Interlaboratory Comparison of Measurements of Temporal Light Modulation – Plan

October

SSL

IEA 4E SSL Annex Interlaboratory Comparison of Measurements of Temporal Light Modulation – Plan

SSL

Quality and performance requirements for LED Lamps and Luminaires

SSL

Quality and performance requirements for LED Lamps and Luminaires

EDNA

Energy Efficiency Metrics for Data Centres

EDNA

Energy Efficiency Metrics for Data Centres

EDNA

Interoperability

EDNA

Interoperability

EDNA

Standardisation for Smart Devices

EDNA

Standardisation for Smart Devices

November

SSL

Smart Lighting – New Features Impacting Energy Consumption: Second Status Report

November

SSL

Smart Lighting – New Features Impacting Energy Consumption: Second Status Report

EDNA

Mobile Device Efficiency

EDNA

Mobile Device Efficiency

EDNA

Guide to Energy Management Protocols

EDNA

Guide to Energy Management Protocols

December

EDNA