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The “How To” Briefing Accompanying the Global Lighting Challenge

Following the launch of the Global Lighting Challenge aiming at deploying 10 billion super-efficient light sources, the IEA 4E SSL Annex today published an Executive Briefing that summarises the best practices, programmes and other initiatives undertaken by its member countries to accelerate the adoption of quality, energy-efficient LED technology in their markets.

By SSL Annex · Solid State Lighting ·

Following the launch of the Global Lighting Challenge aiming at deploying 10 billion super-efficient light sources, the IEA 4E SSL Annex today published an Executive Briefing that summarises the best practices, programmes and other initiatives undertaken by its member countries to accelerate the adoption of quality, energy-efficient LED technology in their markets.

The Global Lighting Challenge was launched at COP 21 with the aim to kick-start a global transition to highly efficient LED lamps that can avoid 801 Mt of CO2 emissions, equivalent to displacing 684 coal-fired power plants around the world. A number of governments, companies and organisations have accepted the challenge. The IEA 4E SSL Annex is among the key partners.

To support the work, the SSL Annex today published a an Executive Briefing that offers policy-makers a concise overview of some of the national-level approaches, initiatives and ideas used to accelerate LED lighting in the market by the IEA 4E SSL Annex member countries. Covering communication and education, market preparation and manufacturer support, these best practices show how governments can support adoption of LED technology by raising awareness, providing tangible examples and ensuring widespread understanding and appreciation of the benefits of LED lighting.

The IEA 4E SSL Annex is committed to assisting policy makers with the development of policies and programmes to promote quality, energy-efficient LED lighting in their markets.  This publication about the lessons learned bringing LEDs to market is the precursor to a larger study that will be issued next year. This publication was issued to coincide with the launch of the Global Lighting Challenge at the UN Climate Conference in Paris, COP21.

“We all recognise the critical role that lighting plays in our daily lives, and now we have technologies available that enable lighting to not only improve in quality but also have a lower life-cycle cost,” said Dr. Peter Bennich, chairman of the SSL Annex’s Management Committee and representative of the Swedish Energy Agency, one of the Annex’s member countries. “As policy makers, we all understand the value of good ideas and approaches to transforming markets, and this briefing pulls some of those ideas together from our members with the hope that other countries can benefit from this work.”

A recent global market study found that lighting consumes approximately 15% of end-use electricity (UNEP en.lighten, 2015). And energy consumption can be reduced without compromising lighting service through market adoption of more energy-efficient, quality lighting products. But there is more to providing light than simply reducing power. A new lighting technology, based on Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs), creates an opportunity to cost-effectively reduce electricity consumption while increasing light quality and control. And while this market has been gradually expanding, policy makers have been working to find the right mix of policies and programmes to ensure their markets attract quality, energy-efficient LED products and avoid the pitfalls and mistakes of the past.

The executive briefing released today presents some of national-level approaches, initiatives and ideas to accelerate and support LED lighting in the market by the IEA 4E SSL Annex member countries. These best practices and lessons can be grouped into three thematic areas:

1) Communication and Education – raising awareness of end-users and key stakeholders in the supply chain;

2) Market Preparation – defining product quality and performance criteria, government leadership, coordination regionally and locally;

3) Manufacturer Support – invest in domestic manufacturers, offer ‘green tech’ financing and assist the standardisation process;

Across all the critical segments of the supply chain, governments are in the driving seat when it comes to raising awareness, providing tangible examples and ensuring widespread understanding and appreciation of the benefits of LED lighting.

CLICK HERE for a link to the Executive Briefing

Read original article at the 4E Solid State Lighting Website